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03-11-2022

Hummingbird Sensing Technology hosts Lord Lieutenant at Queen’s Award ceremony

Queen’s Award winner and expert manufacturer of gas sensors for medical and industrial applications, Hummingbird Sensing Technology, has hosted the Lord Lieutenant and other dignitaries as part of a special ceremony.

Having been awarded the accolade for Enterprise for International Trade earlier this year, parent company Servomex hosted HM Lord Lieutenant of East Sussex, Andrew Blackman, and Vice Lord Lieutenant of East Sussex, Sara Stonor, as part of the Queen’s Award celebrations.

Hummingbird and Servomex colleagues were presented with a trophy/certificate at the UKTC in Crowborough, welcoming the Award representatives. They were joined by the High Sheriff of East Sussex, Jane King and her husband, William, the Deputy Mayor of Crowborough, Martyn Garrett, Chairman of East Sussex County Council, Cllr Peter Pragnell and Wealden District Council Chairman Cllr Ron Reed.

Andy Cowan, President of parent company Servomex, said: “This award is a symbol of the hard work and dedication of all those working within Hummingbird, and across Servomex as a whole. I take immense pride in the positive impact that Hummingbird’s products and services have on the global community.

“They are of enormous benefit to the environment and healthcare, have supported new technological developments, and help to improve our quality of life everywhere.

“This Queen’s Award represents Hummingbird’s incredible achievement in International Trade, delivering outstanding growth across the past six years, and is backed by our strong track record in ethics and sustainability. It was a Herculean effort by all involved, and I’m delighted that this award recognises that.”

Hummingbird received the Award after demonstrating significant growth in international trade over the past five years. Part of this growth was attributed to the ways in which Hummingbird responded to Covid-19. When the pandemic broke out, methods were developed to increase productivity in order to meet heavy demand from partners in the healthcare market as the global need for critical care ventilators soared. In addition to implementing a three-year development program over the course of 14 weeks and introducing stringent hygiene measures, the team developed a new, faster-to-produce model of the paramagnetic oxygen sensor for non-medical OEM customers in an effort to maintain commitments to industrial customers.

HM Lord Lieutenant of East Sussex, Andrew Blackman said Servomex was “no stranger” to the Queen’s Award, referencing the previous award from 2016.
“It’s no mean feat to achieve something like this,” he said. “A huge amount of work goes into it and to win the award is hugely prestigious and is something you should all be very proud of.”

As part of the award, Hummingbird representative Chris Davies also attended a grand reception at Buckingham Palace, hosted by His Royal Highness, the Prince of Wales.

Hummingbird Sensing Technology was launched in 2011 manufacturing gas sensors for medical and industrial applications such as critical care ventilators. In 2016, Hummingbird won the Queen’s Award for Innovation for the development of a small, vibration-resistant sensor designed for medical critical care applications.

Since its formation, Hummingbird has developed world-leading technologies that redefine gas sensor performance. Customers include major producers of equipment such as critical care medical devices, gas analysers for industrial applications, research instruments and deep-sea diving analysis.

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